CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo

 

ESCUELITA
SOCIAL CHOREOGRAPHIES

 

 

Photo by Carlos Muñoz of the workshop Touching Improvisation in the Army of Love training camp at Casco (Utrecht), shared by Aimar Pérez Gali.

ESCUELITA
SOCIAL CHOREOGRAPHIES

SESSIONS JANUARY MAY 2018
TUESDAY, 17:00 – 20:30



16 JANUARY
Basic Instincts (The Robbery)
with Itziar Barrio
There are small everyday gestures whose repetition signifies and establishes rules, constructing cultural grammars and places of resistance: they are forms of non-verbal communication that operate from corporal expression. Through practical work with various audiovisual and theoretical references, this session proposes a (re)thinking of these everyday, minimal and subtle gestures but with a capacity to reaffirm, subvert and interrupt power structures and meanings. To this end we will be working from a practical approach with the iconic and controversial scene from Basic Instinct (1992) by Paul Verhoeven and with the scenes of robberies from Pickpocket (1959) by Robert Bresson: we will be rehearsing crossing legs and stealing wallets and personal objects, done with different intentions and registers, in front of a camera. By working performatively and audiovisually, this device explores the multiplicity of layers that make up the gesture, such as seduction, corporal erotica, legality, the gaze and mechanisms of representation, among others. And from this collective, practical and embodied work, the exercise will also open up the possibility of inventing or, why not, imagining other gestures.

 

Itziar Barrio has shown her work at, among others, MACBA, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Belgrado, PARTICIPANT INC (NYC), Museo del Banco de la República (Bogota), Anthology Films Archives (NYC), Salzburger Kunstverein (Austria), and the Havana Biennial. She has received scholarships and awards from the Brooklyn Art Council, Ministry of Culture of Spain, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, New York Foundation for the Arts, ISCP and Fundación BBVA. She is an associate professor at the School of Visual Arts, NYC.



 

23 JANUARY
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, enabler: a way of working that allows us to do things with María José Belbel
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick (1950-2009) made an instrumental contribution to gender, feminist and sexuality studies and to the consolidation of queer theory. At the same time, her work can also be highly useful as a tool to expand and reformulate our conceptions of what we understand as politics and how we can try to build non-binary pedagogies of knowledge and ways of doing. Binarism is consubstantial with western philosophy, and we might need non-western ways of thinking in order to be able to implement a non-binary philosophy that is capable of counteracting its disastrous consequences.


This is the goal that has led me to wish to publish in Spanish Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy Performativity, her work from 2005, defined by the author as “a project to explore promising tools and techniques for nondualistic thought and pedagogy.”

 

María José Belbel (Granada, 1954). Belbel’s work as a translator and editor is geared towards helping to publicise texts by writers she believes to be important which have not been translated in Spain, or only rarely. These are writers whose learning can improve production with regards the most pressing political issues in our environment. To this end she has translated and published thinkers like Wendy Brown, Gayle Rubin and Esther Newton, Angela McRobbie, Laura Kipnis, Laura Cottingham, Edward Said and, very particularly, the work of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.

 


30 JANUARY

Ensayo Editorial 3
Conceived in conjunction with the future publishing project to be included in Escuelita, Ensayo Editorial is an in-house working space now in its second season. It is based on an expanded understanding of publishing as a composition of different forms of inscription—cultural, corporal, linguistic, territorial, etc.—and forms of (mis)reading. The sessions consist in various exercises that experiment with processes of (re)signification, translation, forms of enunciation and of twisting language as well as interpretation and collective writing, understood as processes of cultural performance in continuous motion and negotiation. They are also a space for self-reflexivity for the group, in which to absorb what we have been working on throughout the year and to digest it in collective productions.


6 FEBRUARY
The Age of Appreciation with Michel Feher
A talk and reading session on the logics of appreciation, self-esteem, credit, human capital and sharing as well as the possibilities of activism to be found in heart of the neoliberal condition.

Michel Feher is a philosopher and writer who has taught at the École Nationale Supérieure, Paris, at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is a founding editor of Zone Books as well as the president of Cette France-là, a monitoring group on French immigration policy. He has just published Le temps des investis (La Découverte), analysing the financialization of life under neoliberalism.


13 FEBRUARY
Shame! Rearm, refigure, transfigure with Diego del Pozo Barriuso
Deeply affected by a strong sense of malaise induced by the neoliberal condition, affective economies are invisible politics destined to produce or intensify a certain emotion. States and systems of governance have generally disavowed the operativity of emotions like, for instance, hate, love and hope, by arguing that they belong to the private realm of personal psychology, thus perpetuating the malaise. However, as Sara Ahmed tells us, affects operate in a fundamentally economic fashion more so than psychological: they circulate between bodies, they adhere to them and accrue value.


This session works performatively with the functioning of affective economies through scores and other materials, focusing particularly on the collective potentialities of shame and touch to produce new capacities for configuring bodies. Shame is closely tied to identity, although without actually giving it form, content or a closed definition. In consequence, it is an affect linked to the potential mutation of subjectivity and to complex, passionate and profound mechanisms associated with queer performativity. In this way, how can we produce a politics of contact other than that of domination?

 

Diego del Pozo Barriuso (Valladolid, 1974) lives and works in Madrid. He is an artist, cultural producer and lecturer at the School of Fine Arts at the University of Salamanca. His work is driven by the politics of emotions, affective economies and how affective mechanisms are socially and culturally produced. He is a member of the art collectives Subtramas, C.A.S.I.T.A. and Declinación Magnética, and also the research group Las Lindes.


20 FEBRUARY
Ensayo Editorial 4
Conceived in conjunction with the future publishing project to be included in Escuelita, Ensayo Editorial is an in-house working space now in its second season. It is based on an expanded understanding of publishing as a composition of different forms of inscription—cultural, corporal, linguistic, territorial, etc.—and forms of (mis)reading. The sessions consist in various exercises that experiment with processes of (re)signification, translation, forms of enunciation and of twisting language as well as interpretation and collective writing, understood as processes of cultural performance in continuous motion and negotiation. They are also a space for self-reflexivity for the group, in which to absorb what we have been working on throughout the year and to digest it in collective productions.


27 FEBRUARY
Touching Improvisation with Aimar Pérez Galí
The idea behind this session is to explore the performativity of touch. When touching, we reduce the distance with the world to a bare minimum: we adhere to things, to the surface of reality. Over and above subjectivity conceived as an isolated identity trapped in its own image, touching opens the possibility of understanding subjectivity as an open, variable and transitory reality in motion and in transformation. Touch enables us to undertake a process of de-identification in which our very limits are always in a constant negotiation with the world. And so, we could think that the performativity of touching has to do with the possibility of a subjectivity which is the product of contact, encounter and direct, transitory experience and that, ultimately, it is something beyond enunciation and language.


TOUCH. The task is to touch. To touch ourselves. To touch the world. To understand the skin as an extraordinary organ that offers us a paradoxical chance to separate from ourselves and at once to connect with the world. IMPROVISATION. The idea is to explore the world through the action of touching. It is not a question of producing or composing sequences of movements based on contact. The exploration demands attention to the present, a deep listening to what is going on. A spherical, non-linear time. This session comes from The Touching Community project.

 

Aimar Pérez Galí develops her art practice in the field of dance and performing arts as a dancer, choreographer, researcher, educator and writer, always understanding the body as a place of reference and dance, not as an end in itself but as a tool for critical transformation. Among her most recent works are _è p i c a_, The Touching Community, and the performative conference Sudando el discurso: una crítica encuerpada, for which she received the Arts Libris 2016 Prize for the tie-in publication.



6 MARCH
Repeat, Insist, Resist with Ariadna Guiteras
It is more than likely that there are remains of sticky substances on your iPad. You like to think that the tip of your fingers touches everything—the screen, the clitoris, the face—and that something takes place there, a kind of tactile transmission. Information passes from the screen to your fingers in a potentially pleasurable and at once violent exchange. It reminds you of that testosteronic game which consists in rubbing the back of the hand to extenuation, while massaging the face. What started as a caress ended up burning like fire, leaving a dirty wound, an inscription on the surface.


“Repeat, insist, resist” is a practical-experimental session, a test ground based on repetition, muscular memory and the transmission of knowledge. We will centre on personal care and how it has been co-opted by neoliberalism, and also on the interstices from where it can be short-circuited, to address the body both as a surface on which to inscribe social codes as well as a guest where ideology is accommodated and embodied.


Ariadna Guiteras (Barcelona, 1986) is a visual artist. She works with performance and installation to address issues such as the body, affect and the transmission of learning from a political and visceral perspective. She is a member of the Nenazas feminist collective since 2012.


13 MARCH
Ensayo Editorial 5
Conceived in conjunction with the future publishing project to be included in Escuelita, Ensayo Editorial is an in-house working space now in its second season. It is based on an expanded understanding of publishing as a composition of different forms of inscription—cultural, corporal, linguistic, territorial, etc.—and forms of (mis)reading. The sessions consist in various exercises that experiment with processes of (re)signification, translation, forms of enunciation and of twisting language as well as interpretation and collective writing, understood as processes of cultural performance in continuous motion and negotiation. They are also a space for self-reflexivity for the group, in which to absorb what we have been working on throughout the year and to digest it in collective productions.



20 MARCH
In the Light of Fire, Ashes Look Like Glitter withAntoni Hervàs
Ovid tells the story of how, a long time ago, Aphrodite punished the women of the island of Lemnos for neglecting her shrines by afflicting them with an evil smell that drove men away. Fed up and ashamed, the women decided to seek revenge and one night they killed all their male relatives, except for one: Queen Hypsipyle saved her father, who left the blood-soaked and burning island dressed as a woman. These events marked the beginning of the Kaviros rites of expiation, enigmatic festivals invoking Chthonic gods based around fire, blood and ridiculing men. At once these rituals connect with a much wider genealogy that embraces revolution, fire, rituals and transvestism, from the Stonewall riots, “The invasion of the Pines” in Fire Island, or the death of Ocaña in his Sun dress, among others.



In the Light of Fire, Ashes Look Like Glitter will be a transformative ritual of drawing and consumption that invokes mythological and contemporary gods of the underground. A collectively built stage setting for the celebration of self-destruction. A festive transformation that announces change; a show to surrender yourself to and to burn in flames, even while aware of the danger involved, for the twinkling of a momentary sparkle.


Antoni Hervàs explores the limits of drawing; a simple yet highly elastic discipline that allows other disciplines not only to adopt to it, but to be absorbed by it, expanding and potentially increasing its creative capacities. The creative process becomes liquid, something that absorbs and is contaminated by its surroundings. In his working methodology he necessarily involves himself physically with studio material, a first-person experience that enables him to analyse and understand those specific issues from a detailed stance.


3 APRIL
Trophic Dances with Carlos Monleón
Maybe life does not evolve through competition and the survival of the fittest. If we were to change the scale and temporality of the gaze, microorganisms show that life develops and unfolds thanks to inter- and eco-dependent relationships. Within the immense and fascinating world of microbiology, SCOBYs (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) are complex ecosystems of bacteria that live in a relationship of syntrophic reciprocity, in other words, they live in a close and persistent relationship based on nutrition and reproduction with other organisms of different species, and can achieve eternal harmony and youth if they are properly treated. The scientist Lynn Margulis—who challenged neo-Darwinist theories and their masculinist focus on science—proposes that, at some point in prehistory, these organisms evolved from preying on one another to a model of symbiotic choreography, based on processes of reciprocal care and nutrition. These co-evolutive choreographies are models of exchange, transformation and growth that not only develop on a microbiological level, but are also the seed for countercultural and counter-pharmaceutical networks transformed into communities of mutual care, as happened in the early years of the HIV crisis.



This session takes the form of a participative afternoon snack to think about conviviality through the reproductive strategies of our microscopic ancestors, in order to rethink our social metabolisms.


Carlos Monleón (Madrid, 1983) works between various levels of corporal perception and sensation, from the biological to the performative and the social. His current search focuses on the evolutive processes of the body that draw a connecting line from unicellular organisms to the development of Artificial Intelligence. Mainly collaboratively, he has exhibited and partaken in projects at Seventeen Gallery, Autoitalia, CA2M - Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Matadero Madrid and HIAP, among others.



7 APRIL
NIGHT STUDIES with Grupal Crew Collective, Julia Morandeira and Manuel Segade, José Salas, Lisa Josephine Vereertbrugghen.
Night Studies is an evening set aside for collectively exploring and invoking the political, social, affective and aesthetic potentialities of the night and darkness. A programme of actions, routes, sounds and stories that produce possible definitions of what nocturnal could mean —its qualities and commonplaces, its movements and singularities— so that we can better understand what we can learn from it. If the indiscernibility of darkness proposes other forms of perception, it also implies aesthetic and pedagogic forms that do not refute the intrinsic opaqueness of all knowledge. To this end, we ask the questions: Which modes of attention and affective economies are proper to the night, and which political dances and social choreographies do they rehearse; which languages and which modes of perception and transmission do they enable, and what nocturnal territories do they outline; what spatial features do they present and under what codes do they operate; in what histories are they inserted and what references do they have? How can we grasp the kind of informal learning that happens at night? How can we transform our methodologies and positions? How can we imagine what Night Studies could entail?



In response to Noche de los Teatros 2018 dedicated to young people, this proposal is a response to a long history and growing defence of the night in Madrid as a space for social reinvention. But it is also a reference to the La Escuelita dance club, a historic venue for the Afro-Latina queer community in New York that closed two years ago, to which this programme is indebted and owes its name.



10 APRIL
Move and Conspire with Julia Morandeira Arrizabalaga
Etymologically, the root of the word conspire speaks to a synchronised and collective respiration or breathing together; a collective body joined by a breath of air and the shared need to act against a common cause. To move, on the other hand, advocates the joint movement of a group of affected bodies. In consequence, how is it possible to imagine a coalition today? Returning to the proposal of the AIDS activist and member of ACT UP Gregg Bordowitz as a question, this session revises various historical and contemporary cases of collective organisation triangulated by health and care, pedagogic and political transformation, and the construction of structures and institutionality. These cases help to introduce the question into the present and to project it towards the future in a focused manner, with the purpose of speculating with the different—aesthetic, political, choreographic and social—devices which we have come across throughout the year at escuelita. Paraphrasing Audre Lorde, today more than ever, collective and personal care has become a battle ground in a war against necro-politics that must force us to recognise our dangerousness as potentiality, and to use it to imagine forms of caring self-defence. To this end, the question of the coalition is pressing today. And for this reason, we have to find and rehearse news ways of moving and conspiring.


Julia Morandeira Arrizabalaga is a curator and researcher. She is co-director, together with Manuel Segade, of the escuelita at CA2M and a mediator in the ConComitentes Project run by the Fundación Daniel and Nina Carasso.

 



17 APRIL
Trainless Trains with Francesc Ruiz
The accumulation of capital generated by the slave system underwrote the cost of developing technologies, like the railway, that drove the industrial revolution and later the disappearance of forced labour. This workshop will engage with the railroad as a distributive metaphor through which to discuss evasive bodies, illegal gestures and agitated collectivities.

Three case studies—"The Underground Railway", the secret network in the USA to help slaves from plantations to escape to the North; "Style Wars" the pioneering documentary on graffiti in the New York subway; and "Soul Train", the US dance and music TV program—will be used as the starting point to reflect on a train that disappears to allow us to see a group of bodies under pressure, seeking a space of visibilisation in which every action and expression is political. When the train is not a machine but a set of bodies in flight, rebelling, loving and dancing.

Francesc Ruiz (Barcelona, 1971) uses comics as an aesthetic, narrative and intellectual substratum, and also as historical and operative material. Applying it as a kind of continent or description of the real (through creation, alteration, replacement or assemblage, among other ways) he generates possible stories that uncover the inner workings with which individual and social identities, sexual identity and also urban identity are constructed. He is currently investigating the bonds between art and distribution.


24 APRIL
Ensayo Editorial 6
Conceived in conjunction with the future publishing project to be included in Escuelita, Ensayo Editorial is an in-house working space now in its second season. It is based on an expanded understanding of publishing as a composition of different forms of inscription—cultural, corporal, linguistic, territorial, etc.—and forms of (mis)reading. The sessions consist in various exercises that experiment with processes of (re)signification, translation, forms of enunciation and of twisting language as well as interpretation and collective writing, understood as processes of cultural performance in continuous motion and negotiation. They are also a space for self-reflexivity for the group, in which to absorb what we have been working on throughout the year and to digest it in collective productions.



8 MAY
Beauty Salon 2
Beauty Salon is a recurrent space in this second season of escuelita. It is a creative space focused on research into politics of style, make-up, hair and nails, understood as places and practices of resistance, care, resignification and fantasy. Beauty salons are places where one can try out new and exceptional forms of intimacy, but where one can also negotiate, abide by or transgress normative impositions. In these sessions escuelita will become a contagious space sharing stories and narratives between different areas of hair, massage and other treatments. This session, coinciding with the end of the school year, will have a festive motif to be decided by members of the group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read 3266 times Last modified on Wednesday, 31 January 2018 11:14