CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo

 

 

FILM ON SUNDAYS
READINGS OF HORROR: THE CATHARTIC FUNCTION OF THE MONSTER
4 MARCH — 22 APRIL
18:30

CURATED BY ELISA PUERTO AUBEL

John Carpenter defined terror in two stories. Both are told to us at night in a little village, around the fire, when the shaman stands up and points to the darkness and says “there lies terror, in the forest and its dangers, in the neighbouring village, in faraway countries, in everything that is Other to us. That is the first fear”. Then the shaman pointed to his own breast and said, “the second fear is here, inside us. It is in the human heart and is harder to tell, because it means that we are all part of the ‘evil’ and the monstrous, that which we have been taught to protect ourselves against.”

This cycle of horror films is based on the following question: What is it about the monster that fascinates us so much? The catharsis we find in fictional horror stories reveals part of our “dark side”, a side that is part of who we are and which fiction helps us to assimilate and to control.

Throughout the history of horror movies, the genre has gradually uncovered the terrors inherent to the human being, as well as the fears of social communities (sometimes used in the name of political propaganda) through more or less subtle metaphors of monsters.


Viewing films like Possession by Andrzej Zulawski or Carnival of Souls by Herk Harvey will serve as a pretext to discuss the hidden meanings behind the mask of the monster and everything that beings like zombies or witches trigger off in our common imaginary. We will discuss how fear is used in audiovisual fiction in order to appropriate our terrors, whether these are conscious or not.

SESSIONS


SUNDAY 4 MARCH 18:30

THE MONSTER AS METAPHOR: AN OVERVIEW OF WESTERN FEARS THROUGH HORROR FILMS
With Elisa Puerto Aubel
Session with Elisa Puerto Aubel, the curator of this cycle, which takes an overview of the history of western horror films and its social contexts in order to examine the different fears that have been used and portrayed in horror films over the last century.

Elisa Puerto Aubel is a screenwriter and script doctor who works in Europe and Latin America, where she also gives classes on Horror Films and the Use of Metaphor in Film.


SUNDAY 11 MARCH 18:30
THE ZOMBIE: FROM VOODOO TO THE INTERNET ERA
Carnival of Souls. Herk Harvey, 1962, English with subtitles in Spanish, 78 min
Talk with Julián Génisson
Following a car accident in which she is the only survivor, Mary moves to Salt Lake City to take up a job as a church organist. Soon however she begins to realise that she is haunted by strange people and events.

This session will take a look at the origins of the zombie and how it has evolved in horror films, as well as its numerous artistic and sociological interpretations. What is it about the zombie that always maintains its currency?

Julián Génisson. Member of the Canódromo Abandonado collective, co-director of “La tumba de Bruce Lee” (2013) and “Esa sensación” (2016).


SUNDAY 18 MARCH 18:30.
WOMEN’S FREEDOM AS SOCIAL TERROR
Possession. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, English with subtitles in Spanish, 127 min
Talk with Pilar Ruiz Gutiérrez


When Mark returns home to Berlin, his wife Anna announces that she wants a divorce. Mark starts to look after their son and soon realises that Anna has a lover, although the lover tells Mark that he is no longer with Anna. Mark then suspects that there is a third lover, who might not perhaps be human.

The unfaithful wife and negligent mother have been depicted in fiction as monsters and witches, representing uncontrolled evil. This session will examine various cinematographic depictions of liberated women, more specifically within horror movies.

Pilar Ruiz Gutiérrez. Journalist and writer. Columnist for CTXT. Expert in film and women.


SUNDAY 8 APRIL 18:30
TECHNOPHOBIA, BODY AND ALTERITY: OUR BODY AS THE “OTHER”
Tetsuo II: Body Hammer. Shinya Tsukamoto, 1992, Japanese with subtitles in Spanish, 83 min
After being kidnapped by a group of skinheads, a man is gradually transformed into a cybernetic weapon whose mutation is speeded up with his captors’ experiments.


Our body is us, but the body also has its own will. When does our body stop being ours? If we operate and transform our body, at what moment does the transformation begin? Bearing in mind the technological advances we apply to our body today, where is the limit of technological invasion?

This session will address the different ways of portraying the human body as an entity with which we cohabit and which is able to rebel against us.


SUNDAY 15 APRIL 18:30.
ONTOLOGICAL TERROR IN FICTION
Angst. Gerald Kargl, 1983, German with subtitles in Spanish, 76 min
Talk with Juan Manuel Romero Martínez
After being released from prison, a mentally disturbed man begins to play out his sadistic fantasies with an unsuspecting family in an isolated house in the countryside.

What is the difference between horror and terror? Where does one end and the other begin? How are terror and horror portrayed in fiction? How are these two concepts used in our society and how are they experienced by humans today?

Juan Manuel Romero Martínez. Lecturer in Philosophy. Expert in ontological terror.


SUNDAY 22 APRIL 18:30
MONSTERA DELICIOSA
Talk with CA2M reading group
The Delicious Monster reading group proposes conversations and readings within the confines of science fiction, terror and fantasy short stories that rethink some of the guises taken by the “monster”, especially those related with women: mermaids, medusas, witches, bearded women, cripples, outcasts... This Film on Sundays session introduces a film to rethink horror from a feminine perspective, questioning what is natural, normal or strange. If horror in films has often been viewed as a kind of catharsis or exorcism of the human being’s immanent fears, as Margaret Atwood argues, forming part of the horror and of the monster is the only way for women to be totally human.

Admission free until capacity is reached